Friday, January 17, 2014

Double Exposure


Unidentified Polaroid found inside of a record sleeve.

Thursday, January 16, 2014

Love, Bubbles


Click here to listen!

Thursday, October 18, 2012

Happy 86th Birthday, Chuck Berry!

T. Renner, "Chuck Berry Statue," 2011, digital photograph.

Happy 86th Birthday to Chuck Berry!

This photo is of a statue of Chuck Berry, who still lives and performs in St. Louis (including just last night!), located on Delmar Boulevard in University City. Harry Weber, sculptor, created this bronze work.

Chuck Berry's official web site says:
Born in St. Louis on October 18, 1926 Berry had many influences on his life that shaped his musical style. He emulated the smooth vocal clarity of his idol, Nat King Cole, while playing blues songs from bands like Muddy Waters.

Chuck Berry's music has transcended generations. He earns respect to this day because he is truly an entertainer. Berry, also known as "The Father of Rock & Roll", gained success by watching the audience's reaction and playing accordingly, putting his listeners' amusement above all else. For this reason, tunes like "Johnny B. Goode," "Maybellene" and "Memphis" have become anthems to an integrated American youth and popular culture. Berry is a musical icon who established rock and roll as a musical form and brought the worlds of black and white together in song.

Sunday, August 5, 2012

Hiatus, "Brain"


This weekend, Vintage Vinyl is having a buy 2, get 1 free sale on our $3.99 used compact discs.

To celebrate, we'll be skimming the bins and posting about some of the gems to be found.

Up now is Brain by the crusty punks Hiatus.

On Anarcho-Punk, Crusty Beckham said:
Here you have Hiatus' last two recordings on one cd, namely "The Brain" from 1996 and "El Sueño" from 1995. Hiatus was one of the very best European bands of the 90's as far as good and powerful crust punk is concerned. They started out in the late 80's as a Doom/Sore Throat/Discard band but had the great taste to add some Antisect influence in the mix. To be honest, Hiatus didn't put out a bad or even an average record.

The first 8 songs of the cd are from the last 10" and they may surprise some with their melodic, almost emocore undertones in the guitar and the drumming (you can hear that Unhinged wasn't too far away by then) while keeping a distinctive crust backbone. The remaining songs are all from the 2nd Lp and here we are in traditional Hiatus territory: fast, potent, catchy crustcore, the way the genre was meant to be played. The vocals are awesome and the drum is just pummelling its way through crusty greatness. Lyrically, Hiatus really wrote their best lyrics on these last two records. Gone are the dischargey haikus and instead you have political songs from a personal point of view, and by this I mean from actual experiences, from the guts, they are stories one can easily relate to.

Golden Bloom, "Fan the Flames"



This weekend, Vintage Vinyl is having a buy 2, get 1 free sale on our $3.99 used compact discs.

To celebrate, we'll be skimming the bins and posting about some of the gems to be found.

It's time to shine the spotlight on Golden Bloom's 2009 release Fan the Flames.

On *blogcritics, Jen Johans writes:
These days it’s become far too easy for musicians to simply cite their influences since inevitably audiophiles and critics can uncover those just by listening to their work.

However, when musician Shawn Fogel, who plays every single instrument in his August 18 release under the band name Golden Bloom, was asked to offer an explanation and influence-laced play-by-play of his effort Fan the Flames, The Smiths and The Beatles received only the tiniest of shout-outs. No, instead of just dubbing a guitar hook Wilco inspired the way that nearly every critic has described Fan the Flames as sounding like that band during their Summerteeth era, Fogel’s artistic muses will definitely surprise.

Drawing upon inspiration discovered in everything from books such as Confessions of an Economic Hitman and The Perks of Being a Wallflower and DVDs including Network, and The Atomic Café, Fogel seems to absorb culture and politics like a sponge.

Saturday, August 4, 2012

Figurines, "Skeleton"


This weekend, Vintage Vinyl is having a buy 2, get 1 free sale on our $3.99 used compact discs.

To celebrate, we'll be skimming the bins and posting about some of the gems to be found.

From 2006, here's Figurine's Skeleton:

Simon Jones wrote, reviewing Skeleton's UK release, on the Progressive-Sounds blog:
File this raw, honest and infectious album next to the debut efforts from Clap Your Hands Say Yeah and former touring mates Cold War Kids and Tapes ´N Tapes. Despite the difference in geography, this Danish four-piece operate in the same musical landscape. Listen carefully and you´ll also hear shades of Modest Mouse, Violent Femmes, Pavement and The Strokes jostling beneath Christian´s Neil Young-minus-the-ennui vocals. The common strand between them all is great songcraft and raw energy -- Figurines have both in spades.

The nucleus of Figurines –- Claus Salling Johansen (guitars), Christian Hjelm(vocals) and former member Andreas Toft (bass) - grew up together in northern Denmark. Like so many small-town bands, they began making music because there was simply nothing else to do. Before long, they hit on a winning sound and released a debut EP in 2001.

Ex Reverie, "Door Into Summer"


This weekend, Vintage Vinyl is having a buy 2, get 1 free sale on our $3.99 used compact discs.

To celebrate, we'll be skimming the bins and posting about some of the gems to be found.

Here we have Ex Reverie's 2008's Door Into Summer.

Prefix Mag's Eli Halpern said:
Ex Reverie is an exciting band to listen to. The Door into Summer is the kind of album that makes you impatient for the next one. Chadwick works in a timeless vocabulary of sounds and syllables, a language that welcomes the modern world into the bosom of nature. In this way it is a generous and boundless music for all its darkness. Ex Reverie's debut would be an apt manifesto of Language of Stone's sonic sensibilities as well as its distinctly tribal relation to the ethics and economics of music-making in the new millennium.